Cast Of Young Frankenstein

    young frankenstein

  • Young Frankenstein is a 1974 American comedy film directed and written by Mel Brooks, starring Gene Wilder as the title character. Teri Garr, Cloris Leachman, Marty Feldman, Peter Boyle, Madeline Kahn, Kenneth Mars, and Gene Hackman also star. The screenplay was written by Brooks and Wilder.
  • Young Frankenstein is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. He first appears in Teen Titans vol. 3 #38 (September 2006), and was created by Geoff Johns and Tony Daniel.
  • Young Frankenstein, officially known as The New Mel Brooks Musical Young Frankenstein, is a musical with a book by Mel Brooks and Thomas Meehan and music and lyrics by Brooks.

    cast

  • the actors in a play
  • project: put or send forth; “She threw the flashlight beam into the corner”; “The setting sun threw long shadows”; “cast a spell”; “cast a warm light”
  • deposit; “cast a vote”; “cast a ballot”
  • Throw (something) forcefully in a specified direction
  • Direct (one’s eyes or a look) at something
  • Throw (something) so as to cause it to spread over an area

cast of young frankenstein

cast of young frankenstein – Young Frankenstein

Young Frankenstein
Young Frankenstein
Mel Brooks’ monstrously crazy tribute to Mary Shelley’s classic pokes hilarious fun at just about every Frankenstein movie ever made. Summoned by a will to his late grandfather’s castle in Transylvania, young Dr. Frankenstein (Gene Wilder) soon discovers

If you were to argue that Mel Brooks’s Young Frankenstein ranks among the top-ten funniest movies of all time, nobody could reasonably dispute the claim. Spoofing classic horror in the way that Brooks’s previous film Blazing Saddles sent up classic Westerns, the movie is both a loving tribute and a raucous, irreverent parody of Universal’s classic horror films Frankenstein (1931) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935). Filming in glorious black and white, Brooks re-created the Frankenstein laboratory using the same equipment from the original Frankenstein (courtesy of designer Kenneth Strickfaden), and this loving attention to physical and stylistic detail creates a solid foundation for nonstop comedy. The story, of course, involves Frederick Frankenstein (Gene Wilder) and his effort to resume experiments in re-animation pioneered by his late father. (He’s got some help, since dad left behind a book titled How I Did It.) Assisting him is the hapless hunchback Igor (Marty Feldman) and the buxom but none-too-bright maiden Inga (Teri Garr), and when Frankenstein succeeds in creating his monster (Peter Boyle), the stage is set for an outrageous revision of the Frankenstein legend. With comedy highlights too numerous to mention, Brooks guides his brilliant cast (also including Cloris Leachman, Madeline Kahn, Kenneth Mars, and Gene Hackman in a classic cameo role) through scene after scene of inspired hilarity. Indeed, Young Frankenstein is a charmed film, nothing less than a comedy classic, representing the finest work from everyone involved. Not one joke has lost its payoff, and none of the countless gags have lost their zany appeal. From a career that includes some of the best comedies ever made, this is the film for which Mel Brooks will be most fondly remembered. Befitting a classic, the Special Edition DVD includes audio commentary by Mel Brooks, a “making of” documentary, interviews with the cast, hilarious bloopers and outtakes, and the original theatrical trailers. No video library should be without a copy of Young Frankenstein. And just remember–that’s Fronkensteen. –Jeff Shannon

Beyond Young Frankenstein
High Anxiety

Spaceballs
Blazing Saddles

Stills from Young Frankenstein (Click for larger image)

If you were to argue that Mel Brooks’s Young Frankenstein ranks among the top-ten funniest movies of all time, nobody could reasonably dispute the claim. Spoofing classic horror in the way that Brooks’s previous film Blazing Saddles sent up classic Westerns, the movie is both a loving tribute and a raucous, irreverent parody of Universal’s classic horror films Frankenstein (1931) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935). Filming in glorious black and white, Brooks re-created the Frankenstein laboratory using the same equipment from the original Frankenstein (courtesy of designer Kenneth Strickfaden), and this loving attention to physical and stylistic detail creates a solid foundation for nonstop comedy. The story, of course, involves Frederick Frankenstein (Gene Wilder) and his effort to resume experiments in re-animation pioneered by his late father. (He’s got some help, since dad left behind a book titled How I Did It.) Assisting him is the hapless hunchback Igor (Marty Feldman) and the buxom but none-too-bright maiden Inga (Teri Garr), and when Frankenstein succeeds in creating his monster (Peter Boyle), the stage is set for an outrageous revision of the Frankenstein legend. With comedy highlights too numerous to mention, Brooks guides his brilliant cast (also including Cloris Leachman, Madeline Kahn, Kenneth Mars, and Gene Hackman in a classic cameo role) through scene after scene of inspired hilarity. Indeed, Young Frankenstein is a charmed film, nothing less than a comedy classic, representing the finest work from everyone involved. Not one joke has lost its payoff, and none of the countless gags have lost their zany appeal. From a career that includes some of the best comedies ever made, this is the film for which Mel Brooks will be most fondly remembered. Befitting a classic, the Special Edition DVD includes audio commentary by Mel Brooks, a “making of” documentary, interviews with the cast, hilarious bloopers and outtakes, and the original theatrical trailers. No video library should be without a copy of Young Frankenstein. And just remember–that’s Fronkensteen. –Jeff Shannon

Beyond Young Frankenstein
High Anxiety

Spaceballs
Blazing Saddles

Stills from Young Frankenstein (Click for larger image)

Lord Byron, John Polidori and their Doppelgangers

Lord Byron, John Polidori and their Doppelgangers
History Redux? The two portraits on the right of this mosaic are George Gordon, Lord Byron, the famous and popular early 19th century poet (top), and Dr. John Polidori (bottom), who was Byron’s young doctor (and possibly his lover, certainly his drug dispenser) for a short time during the summer of 1816; he was with Byron that summer when Percy Shelley, the poet, arrived with his wife Mary and his wife’s cousin Claire Clairmont for a visit at Byron’s rented villa on Lake Geneva. One night Byron suggested that they all write horror stories to amuse themselves. Mary Shelley wrote what would become Frankenstein and Polidori wrote a story called The Vampyre, the first story where a vampire is a suave aristocrat (modeled on the heartthrob Byron, no doubt) and the forerunner to later works like Dracula. The story of Polidori and Byron has fascinated me for years (were they lovers or not?), and then I ran across the pictures of two porn models (the top one is named "Clay," the bottom one is an anonymous British kid) and I was struck at how much they looked like the portraits of my famous obsessions. Reincarnation? Or just possible good casting for a movie or play?

Byron died in 1824 (age 36) during a war for Greek Independence; Polidori had a hard time convincing people that he, and not Byron, had written The Vampyre, and had to sue to get recognition, and he died in 1821 (at age 26), broke from gambling debts in his father’s house in Soho. There’s a plaque on the house now, and I went to visit it when I was in London in 2002. An Indian girl stood in the second floor window and watched me take a picture of her house. I think she was used to gothic romantics paying homage to one of the Founding Fathers of the Tradition!

Frankenstein Conquers the World (Toho, 1965) Japanese B2

Frankenstein Conquers the World (Toho, 1965) Japanese B2
Frankenstein Conquers the World (Toho, 1965). Japanese B2 (20" X 29").

Riding high on the success of their Godzilla series, Toho Studios cast about for other giant monsters with which to thrill the movie-going public. One idea was to have Godzilla fight the ever-popular Frankenstein Monster, but this idea was abandoned, as it was felt the fight scenes would be too implausible. The character of Frankenstein must have resonated with someone, though, as Toho soon devised a way to bring Mary Shelley’s creation into their universe: in the closing days of World War II, the heart of the Frankenstein Monster is brought to Japan. Soon after reaching Hiroshima, that city is virtually obliterated by the atomic bomb, and the heart is thought lost forever. It is, however, found by a young scavenger, who eats it, and, years later, begins to mutate due to the bizarre properties of the heart and the effects of radiation. The boy grows to monstrous size and runs away before he can be destroyed by the authorities, but when the giant monster Baragon appears, the mutated boy is Japan’s only hope for salvation. Originally titled Furankenshutain Tai Chitei Kaiju Baragon (Frankenstein versus the Subterannean Monster Baragon), it was retitled Frankenstein Conquers the World for its release in the U.S., a title by which many fans know it today. The film is notable for the lead roles played by Nick Adams, perhaps best known as TV’s Johnny Yuma, and Kumi Mizuno, known to kaiju fans for her work in several Godzilla films

cast of young frankenstein

Young Frankenstein: The New Mel Brooks Musical
ORIGINAL CAST RECORDING YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN MUSIC AND LYRICS BY MEL BROOKS — IT’S ALIVE!

From the creators of the record-breaking Broadway sensation The Producers comes this monster new musical comedy, YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN, based on the Oscar-nominated smash-hit 1974 film. A wickedly inspired re-imagining of the Frankenstein legend based on Mel Brooks’ classic comedy masterpiece, the story follows bright young Dr. Frankenstein (that’s Fronkensteen) as he attempts to complete his grandfather’s masterwork and bring a corpse to life. Together with his oddly shaped and endearing helper Igor (that’s Eye-gor), his curvaceous lab assistant Inga, and in spite of his incredibly self-involved madcap fiance, Elizabeth, Frankenstein succeeds in creating a monster – but not without scary and quite often hilarious complications.

With such memorable tunes as “The Transylvania Mania,” “He Vas My Boyfriend” and “Puttin’ On The Ritz,” The New MEL BROOKS Musical YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN is scientifically-proven, monstrously good entertainment…and the only place you’ll witness a singing and dancing laboratory experiment in the largest tuxedo ever made. YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN features music and lyrics by the three-time Tony Award® winner Mel Brooks, book by Brooks and three-time Tony Award® winner Thomas Meehan, and is directed and choreographed by five-time Tony Award® winner Susan Stroman. The show stars Roger Bart (“Desperate Housewives”), Megan Mullally (“Will and Grace”),Tony-Award winner Sutton Foster (“Drowsy Chaperone”), SCTV’s Andrea Martin and Christopher Fitzgerald (“Wicked”).

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN opens at Broadway’s Hilton Theater – Friday, November 9th!
Young Frankenstein Photos

More from Mel Brooks
The Producers (Musical Highlights)
The Producers (2005 Movie Soundtrack)
The Producers (2001 Original Broadway Cast)

The Mel Brooks Collection
The History of the World, Part I
High Anxiety

Spaceballs
Blazing Saddles (30th Anniversary Special Edition)
Twelve Chairs

Unlike The Producers, the musical version of Young Frankenstein was not met with critical adoration when it opened on Broadway in November, 2007. Mel Brooks had followed the same formula, transferring all of his own source movie’s famous lines and plot points to the stage, but oddly, the cast album works better than the stage production, which is indeed often lumbering. Brooks’ songs are still fairly derivative but here, undistracted by director Susan Stroman’s flat staging, you can focus more on Doug Besterman’s excellent orchestrations and on the adept cast itself. As Dr. “Fronkensteen,” Roger Bart is much less grating than on stage, for instance. As Inga, Sutton Foster exhibits some mad yodeling skills in “Roll in the Hay” and sounds like a classic Broadway babe on “Listen to Your Heart.” Megan Mullally (Elizabeth) sells “Please Don’t Touch Me,” “Deep Love,” and “Alone” (a bonus track cut from the show), while Andrea Martin (Frau Blucher) kills with the Brecht-Weill pastiche “He Vas My Boyfriend.” And yes, Irving Berlin’s “Puttin’ on the Ritz” is included, complete with monster grunts and a long tap passage in this extended version. The show may not be worth the hype, but the recording is a pleasant surprise. –Elisabeth Vincentelli